Tuesday, September 13, 2016

Monday ... Wait a minute, it's Tuesday already!

Whilst walking the yard this morning to check on the pecan and clean out my little car, I decided to take some pictures.
 I honestly thought we had finally killed them. The Honeysuckle are back.
 I swear to you, I have been working at trying to kill these, honest!
 They are everywhere around the porch, I hate to resort to poison ...
 Thanks, Bubba! So much for patching up our tree! Lousy crumb!
Any idea what ate theleaves and left this mess hanging on the tree? See pecans? Bet the crows get them first!
Wild Persimmons

 Wild Persimmons, these are on a small tree. There are 3 persimmon trees on our property and another on the other side of the fence. Nearly impossible to get at, they are in the 3-4' strip of property between the horses fence and the idiotic barb wire fence the regular grapes are on. There are also blackberry canes and some kind of spiked Devil's Club trees in the mix. I think we need to rent one of those 'DR trimmers' to even get close! There is no walking in there.
 Tacky and Jill were curious as to why I was out there so long.

23 comments:

  1. Love the Jill shot with her little tongue stuck out :) Kudzu and honeysuckle, two viney plants that are almost impossible to get rid of. I can remember my Dad down on his hands and knees, as old man, trying to dip up a stubborn patch of honeysuckle...within hours he was in the hospital with a blood clot. So the bum did nothing about your injured tree...go figure! When I was a kid we had "webworms" that would get in the apple tree...try here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fall_webworm and see if this helps you. How exciting to live where there are wild fruits, etc., haven't had the opportunity for picking wild fruit since the late 1960s early 1970s when I could pick blackberries beside the Intercoastal Waterway.

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    1. Yep, big strain on a body trying to get rid of the vines - sorry to hear that about your dad, he was probably angry when they wouldn't all come up.
      Not sure if that web thing is the same, probably something similar. We will have to do something - If that root shock doesn't kill it, maybe the whatevertheyare will.

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  2. I've never even seen honeysuckle growing and have no idea how to kill it. Why is it the stuff we don't want thrives and the stuff we do like has to be babied along? The Wild Persimmons are fascinating.

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    1. We have been bleaching or vinegaring (yes, I know that isn't a word) the hot thirsty plants. Thought it had worked. The morning glories grow new vines practically over night.
      You're right, if I wanted to grow that stuff, I wouldn't be able to.

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  3. I like the honeysuckle...I guess it is in a bad location.

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    1. A little whiff of honeysuckle as you drive down the road is pleasant. A porch surrounded by honeysuckle is sickeningly sweet.

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  4. I have that purple flower growing everywhere in one of my front gardens. I didn't plant it. It just appeared. I'm going to need strong muscles and a strong back to help me get rid of it.
    Now just need to find it somewhere

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    1. Nooooo! Never plant that stuff on purpose, you just can't contain it, once it gets a hold! We have Honeysuckle, Morning Glories, and Periwinkles - we never planted, the previous owners didn't plant (that I know of) they just sneaked in and took over.

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  5. Love the pictures of Tacky and Jill. So very cute!

    That is a shame that the trailer damaged your tree. Did the guy fix the mailbox post?

    Some vines can just be so invasive that the only way to get them eradicated is using a herbicide. I occasionally resort to a spritz here and there to keep things in check.

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    1. Tacky is 4 now, she and Jill have always been 'Buddies.'
      That man did fix the mailbox, but DH had to take it off and redo - the door wouldn't open.
      Time for the chemicals, I'm afraid. I don't like it though.

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  6. glad to see jill is getting her shot at the header. :) thinking the web was caterpillars? who knows.

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    1. As you know, it's hard to catch a good pic of Jill. She cannot be aware that I'm taking a pic or she looks like one of those dogs in a dirty kennel trying to get you to send money.
      I'm not sure about the webs ...

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  7. The honeysuckle is actually looking quite pretty in the photos you posted! What do persimmons taste like? I have never seen one around in my region.

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    1. Honeysuckle is quite pretty on an old fence row - far away from the house.
      I have no idea what the persimmons taste like, I guess I will find out later on in the season. The net says they are hardy in zones 6 - 10. I really have no idea what our zone is.

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  8. The purple flowers look like convolvolus, not sure of the spelling there, I'm not a fan of it, but I do love honeysuckle and I'm sorry you're trying to kill it. Is it small enough to dig up and move somewhere away from the porch?
    Now I'm off to google webworms.

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    1. The purple flowers are blue, and no, no way to move them. They grow from their seeds and their seeds are wayyyy too plentiful. Those vines twist around everything and are quite tough once they get going. If I could put forth enough energy to pull those things up once they start, I would do it. I once had a thought of gathering up the seeds to give away to those who love them and realized that I wouldn't be doing them any favors.

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    2. I meant moving the honeysuckle. You can kill the blue flowered vine as much as you like.

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  9. I like honeysuckle, but I guess mine is growing where I want it. Whatever is a webworm ... must check that out.

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    1. Glad you like it! It can get carried away and choke out other precious things. We had a royal battle once they got into the scuppernongs/muscadines.

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  10. We had webs like that at our farm. To get rid of the feasting larvae -caterpillars that come out we had to make torches and burn that area but carefully . It was the only way but it was a must because the little critters gnaw awaynatbeverything till the plant dies or the tree.

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    1. I wonder if the larvae are still around or if they have already left to do the damage. It will be burned (carefully) nonetheless. Thanks!

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  11. Have you tried just taking a shovel and cutting into the roots and then dumping epsom salts on the roots? I've seen success with that. Invasive plants can be such a pain. I would try relocating the honeysuckle. It's good for bees. :)

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    1. I will give the Epsom salts a try, hadn't thought of that. Would sure beat toxic spray! Thanks for the idea.
      Oh, don't worry, there is still an abundance of honeysuckle in the area.

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Thanks for stopping by, I am always happy to hear what you have to say. Have a pleasant day!